Master Sustainable Development and Environmental Management Ranking master Sustainable Development and Environmental Management

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Available spots

Rank School / Program Informations Apply
Italy
1
****
U.S.A.
2
****
U.S.A.
3
****
U.S.A.
4
****
Portugal
5
****
Finland
6
****
France
7
****
U.S.A.
8
****
Canada
9
****
United Kingdom
10
****
Canada
11
****
South Korea
12
****
Netherlands
13
****
Peru
14
****
Czech Republic
15
****
South Africa
16
****
Colombia
17
****
United Kingdom
18
****
Portugal
19
****
Belgium
20
****
United Kingdom
21
****
Italy
22
****
Italy
23
****
Brazil
24
****
Australia
25
****
Austria
26
****
Switzerland
27
****
China
28
****
Australia
29
****
United Kingdom
30
****
Canada
31
****
Canada
32
****
Sweden
33
****
Sweden
34
****
Mexico
35
****
Peru
36
****
Denmark
37
****
Ireland
38
***
United Kingdom
39
***
Canada
40
***
United Kingdom
41
***
Australia
42
***
Spain
43
***
Sweden
44
***
Chile
45
***
France
46
***
Poland
47
***

Available spots> Apply now

United Kingdom
48
***
Chile
49
***
Senegal
50
***
Canada
51
***
United Kingdom
52
***
Netherlands
53
***
U.S.A.
54
***
India
55
***
Canada
56
***
New Zealand
57
***
Hungary
58
***
Brazil
59
***
U.S.A.
60
***
U.S.A.
61
***
Malaysia
62
***
Argentina
63
***
Italy
64
***
Morocco
65
***
Brazil
66
***
Hungary
67
**
France
68
**
China
69
**
U.S.A.
70
**
Germany
71
**
Israel
72
**
United Kingdom
73
**
France
74
**
Lebanon
75
**
U.S.A.
76
**
Norway
77
**
Italy
78
**
China
79
**
Switzerland
80
**
Hungary
81
**
China
82
**
China
83
**
France
84
**

Available spots> Apply now

United Kingdom
85
*
United Kingdom
86
*
United Kingdom
87
*
Spain
88
*
Slovakia
89
*
Malaysia
90
*
Italy
91
*
United Kingdom
92
*
Ireland
93
*
Spain
94
*
India
95
*
India
96
*
Dominican Rep.
97
*
Mexico
98
*
Rwanda
99
*
Brazil
100
*

The expert's corner

Universidade Nova de Lisboa

Sustainable development is “development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs”, underlying the intergenerational concern. An important dimension relates to the natural environment, and the increasing concern regarding the implications of the current pace of economic growth for the quality of the environment and sustainability. Since the economic value of natural ecosystems derives from the value of goods and services they provide, typically non-marketed public goods, largely unmeasured, preservation priorities are motivated by the costs imposed by degradation of those services. As “what gets measured, gets managed”, it is well understood that for managing the interactions between the natural environment and economic activity it is key that nations seek a measure to judge whether their economies’ productive base, consisting of the total array of assets, is non-decreasing at a given point in time, as the usual measures of economic performance such as gross domestic product (GDP) cannot provide it. At the local/regional level there is an increasing awareness that spatial patterns of costs and benefits can be very different, as distinct populations react differently. Thus, to minimize conservation-development tradeoffs policy evaluation is key, requiring interdisciplinary tailor-made policy design.